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  • JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

    Royals, Olympiens rule volleyball court

    They opened the tournament as top dogs and when the dust finally settled on the boys and girls AAAA provincial high school volley finals Monday night, it was the two No. 1-ranked teams left celebrating in the winner’s circle.

     

    The Collège Jeanne-Sauvé Olympiens defeated the Portage Collegiate Saints to clinch the girls title, while the Lord Selkirk Royals upended the River East Collegiate Kodiaks to claim the boys title. Both matches needed four games to crown a champion, with every team earning hearty applause by the hundreds of fans who filled the seats at the University of Manitoba’s Investors Group Athletic Centre.

     

    Click here for the full story from the Winnipeg Free Press.

     

  • Kevin King/Winnipeg Sun

    Lord Selkirk Royals repeat as boys volleyball champions

    For the second year in a row, the Lord Selkirk Royals will wear the crown as the top varsity boy’s high school volleyball team in the province.

     

    The No.1-ranked Royals took down the No.2-ranked River East Kodiaks in four sets (21-25, 25-23, 25-18, 25-22) on Monday night to win the provincial championship for the eighth time in school history. The Kodiaks were looking for their first provincial title in varsity boy’s volleyball since 1982.

     

    Click here for the full story from the Winnipeg Sun.

     

  • Kevin King/Winnipeg Sun

    Olympiens win girls volleyball title

    There’s a new powerhouse in Manitoba high school girls’ volleyball and it’s the Collège Jeanne-Sauvé Olympiens.

     

    The No.1-ranked Olympiens won their first varsity girls’ provincial title in school history on Monday night, defeating the No.3-ranked Portage Collegiate Saints in four sets (26-24, 25-16, 19-25-25-14).

     

    Click here for the full story from the Winnipeg Sun.

     

  • Kevin King/Winnipeg Sun/Postmedia Network

    High school boys volleyball final set

    The second-seeded River East Kodiaks will head to the provincial final after a straight set victory over the third-seeded Dakota Collegiate Lancers (25-19, 25-22, 25-22) yesterday. The Kodiaks are led by Hudson Wall, who was ranked the second best player in the province in the Winnipeg Sun’s annual coaches poll. To the surprise of no one, Wall was the focal point River East’s offence in the semi-final last night at the Investors Group Athletic Centre. Dakota had two, sometimes three, blockers on him all game but it wasn’t enough to take down Wall.

     

    The Kodiaks will meet a school in Monday’s final that are no strangers to giving out licks on the volleyball court and winning provincial banners. They will challenge the top-seeded Lord Selkirk Royals, who punched their ticket to the championship game after defeating the fourth-seeded St. Paul’s Crusaders in four sets (25-22, 25-23, 22-25, 25-22) in the late game last night.

     

    Click here for the full story from the Winnipeg Sun.

     

  • PHIL HOSSACK / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

    Lancers run into great Wall

    Collectively and emphatically, the River East Kodiaks say 35 years is long enough.

     

    The Kodiaks, showing the steely resolve of a squad whose time has come, hammered the Dakota Lancers in straight sets Thursday night to advance to the Manitoba AAAA high school boys volleyball championship.

     

    River East hasn’t won the title since 1982.

     

    Guided by their undisputed leader, exceptionally skilled Grade 12 athlete Hudson Wall, the No. 2-ranked Kodiaks knocked off the third-seeded Lancers 3-0 (25-19, 25-22, 25-22) at Investors Group Athletic Centre (IGAC) to book a spot in the Manitoba championship next week.

     

    The Kodiaks meet the No. 1-ranked and defending champion Lord Selkirk Royals in the Manitoba final, scheduled for Monday at 8 p.m. at IGAC.

     

    Lord Selkirk defeated the fourth-ranked St. Paul’s Crusaders 3-1 (25-22, 25-23, 22-25, 25-22) in the Thursday’s late semifinal match.

     

    Click here for the full story from the Winnipeg Free Press.